Restoring hope and dignity

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Housing and Support
Housing and Support

Housing and Support

Adullam Homes provides high quality accommodation ranging from hostels, self-contained flats, bedsits through to houses. In addition we also work with private rental agencies, local authorities and other registered providers to further enhance the accommodation available to meet the ever changing needs of the people we support.

We support the most vulnerable people in society today and we offer hope and dignity in the following ways:

  • Housing and resettlement
  • Independent living skills
  • Access to education and training
  • Employment skills
  • Health and well-being initiatives
  • Benefits advice
  • Confidence building
  • Emotional support

     

 

Many companies charge a fee for helping you deal with debts. StepChange Debt Charity offer free, confidential debt advice to anyone who needs their support. You can use their online debt advice tool, Debt Remedy which will give you tailored advice and recommend the best solution to your debt problem. You can also call their Helpline on 0800 138 1111.

Case Study

Steve's Story

I’m 63 and have just celebrated 12 months sober. This is the only time I’ve been sober and living without drink since I was first taken into a pub when I was about 11 years old. This was with my dad, and it was the ‘norm’ to go into the pub after dad finished work more or less every night.... read more

Steve's Story

I’m 63 and have just celebrated 12 months sober. This is the only time I’ve been sober and living without drink since I was first taken into a pub when I was about 11 years old. This was with my dad, and it was the ‘norm’ to go into the pub after dad finished work more or less every night.

I started working when I was 15. The drinking continued every night after work, but I didn’t think it was ever problematic, I was just being sociable! I moved on to a better paid job working as a steel erector/roofer. The drinking increased with more income but again I thought I am in control.

I went into the army in 1969 and this is when the drinking became out of control. I saw things that will haunt me for the rest of my life, and I was probably suffering post traumatic shock when I returned to Cheshire although this was never recognised then.

The drinking became worse. I was married and that failed. I went back as a roofer/steel erector and it is only by the grace of God that I managed to stay alive as I was so drunk when I went to work it’s a wonder I didn’t injure myself let alone others. In the end I was told not to come to work. I was considered too risky, and this is when my life took a spiral downwards. With no income I became homeless and ended up sleeping under bridges or with anyone who would have me for a few nights.

I recognised I needed help and did attend AA but I was an angry drunk. I would swear and shout and shake my fist, and generally disrupt the meetings. I became the man no one wanted to know. I did find a flat but I used to lock myself away, drinking all day, and generally shunning the world. I used to line my bottles up, fall asleep and then drink from the moment I woke up. One day I woke up and I was shaking so much I could hardly reach my bottle. I tried to make a cup of tea but I couldn’t hold the cup. I needed help.

It was then I contacted the alcohol team and my worker came out and after checking this time I really wanted it I began a home detox. This was followed by a short spell in a rehab unit before finally moving to the Adullam project.

My life is completely different now. I am content. I have a circle of friends who I have known all my life, back in my life. I volunteer at the local church and recently cleaned the windows which haven’t been cleaned for 20 years. The sunbeams shine through them and this makes me feel good. I have a partner Sarah, we enjoy shopping and getting together with our friends. I enjoy life without alcohol and I enjoy the simple things in life.

I am soon to become a senior peer mentor at the project and I am looking forward to helping people on their recovery journey and hope I can show them that even with a lifetime of addiction it is never too late to start living again.

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